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Submitted: 13 December 2012 Modified: 12 October 2016

Herdin Record #: PCHRD12121308392212

The sodium and potassium content of Philippine foods: I. Foods of plant origin.

Researchers

NameRole
1Solita F. Camara-Besa Author
2Minerva Bataclan Author

Publication Information

1.
Publication Type:
Journal
Publication Sub Type:
Journal Article, Original
Title:
Acta Medica Philippina
Frequency:
Quarterly
Publication Date:
July-September 1952
Volume:
9
Issue:
1
Page(s):
1-30
Publisher:
College of Medicine and theInstitute of Public Health, University of the Philippines - Manila

Abstract

The sodium and potassium content of 282 samples representing 218 different foods items and six samples of water are presented in two tables. Our results on 38 food items are compared with two studies by American workers in a third table. In agreement with findings in the United States our results show that our foods of plant origin generally have low sodium content. Most of them have less than 10 mg of this mineral per 100 gm edible portion. This is especially true with fruits, shoots, vegetable flowers, vegetable fruits and legums and unprocessed cereals. Wider variations (from 1 to more than 1000 mg per 100 gm edible portion in a few items) were observed among the leafy vegetables, vegetable roots, bulbs and tubers, the pulses, nuts and seeds and the starches, sugars and syrups. On the other hand, the potassium content generally was more than a hundred mg, sometimes above one thousand mg per 100 gm edible portion. Comparison with two studies of American authors using the same experimental methods also brings out the fact that despite the relatively big differences in individual values for several items, the foods studied which are of plant origin have low sodium and high potassium content. Our public water supply to the city of Manila and its suburbs has low sodium and potassium content. In contrast to this, one sample obtained from a deep well 300 feet from the shore line of Manila Bay gave high sodium and potassium values.


Physical Location

LocationCall NumberAvailable FormatAvailability
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development Library Fulltext Print Format (Request Document)
UPM Fulltext pdf (Request Document)

References

1. Bills, C.E. , McDonald, F.G. , Niedermeier, W. and, Schwartz, M.C. . "Sodium and Potassium in Foods and Waters, Determination by Flame Photometer" Journal of the American Dietetic Association 25, 304, 1949
2. Intengan, C. LL. , Alejo, L. , Concepcion, I. , Yaptinchay, C. , Pobre, V. , Salud, R. and, Manalo, J. . "Composition of Philippine Foods I. (In press)" Philippine Journal of Science 82, 1953
3. Intengan, C. LL. , Concepcion, I. , Salud, R. , Manalo, J. , del Rosario, I. and, Arzaga, V. . "Composistion of Foods II. (In preparation)" ,
4. Leaf, A. and, Couter, W.T. . "Evidence that Renal Sodium Excretion by Normal Human Subjects is Regulated by Adrenal Cortical Activity" J Clin Invest 28, 1067, 1949
5. Fox, C.L. Jr. . "Stable Internal Standard Flame Photometer" Anal Chem 23, 137, 1951
6. Berry, J.W. , Chappell, D.G. and, Barnes, R.B. . "Improved Method of Flame Photometry." Indust Engin Chem Anal Ed 18, 19, 1946
7. Camara-Besa, S.F. . "The serum sodium and potassium values in normal Filipino students" Acta Medica Philippina 8, 151, 1952
8. Irwin, B.L. and, Schuck, C. . "Sodium Values of a Selected Group of Foods." Journal of the American Dietetic Association 27, 98, 1951
9. Cordero, N. and, Lawas, I.L. . "A Simple Automatic Water Distiller." The Review of SCientific Instruments (U.S.A.) 20, 840, 1949

Citation